Menu

Lake Erie Caucus meets to discuss health of the lake

L to R co-chairs for the Lake Erie Caucus: Redfern, Cafaro, Gardner and Dovilla

Members of the Lake Erie Caucus met Friday, August 16, at Maumee Bay State Park to have a public forum about the health of Lake Erie. In attendance were co-chairs of the caucus Mike Dovilla, Capri Cafaro, Randy Gardner and Chris Redfern; other caucus members, representatives from the agricultural and scientific communities, area mayors and city council members and concerned citizens.

“This isn’t government speaking to government,” said Senator Randy Gardner, “its citizens speaking to their elected officials.”

The Lake Erie Caucus is an educational and advocacy caucus, not a legislative being.

Read more...

Protect and Promote Lake Erie

Editor’s note: The following is a statement from State Senator Randy Gardner, founder and co-chairman of the Lake Erie Caucus who represents more Lake Erie shoreline than any other member of the Ohio Senate.  He represents the 2nd Senate District, which includes the Lake Erie counties of Lucas, Ottawa and Erie.  He visited the Ottawa County communities of Port Clinton, Catawba Island Township and Marblehead on Monday and visited Erie County on Tuesday to hand-deliver the following message to community leaders:

Over the past three years, I have been especially engaged in efforts to help heal our great natural asset, Lake Erie.   New programs like the Healthy Lake Erie Fund to help with agricultural best practices to reduce nutrient runoff and Ohio’s first-ever fund to begin to reduce open lake dumping of dredge materials is going to make a difference.

Read more...

Natural solution to algae problem in western Lake Erie 

Image courtesy of NOAA

Editor’s note: this article was written by Ray Stewart, President of Ohio Wetlands Association and Dr. William J. Mitsch, Professor Emeritus, The Ohio State University; Director, Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, OSU; Eminent Scholar and Director, Everglades Wetland Research Park; Founding Editor-in-Chief, Ecological Engineering

Officials may be hedging their responses to the latest water crisis in the western Lake Erie basin but there is no mystery to what is going on. While the investigation into specifics about this particular spike have not been completed, the general causes are well understood. 

Too many nutrients, especially phosphorus, have made their way into the water. Agricultural fertilizers, septic systems, sewage treatment plants and concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are all contributors. These nutrients, combined with the long day lengths and the warmer temperatures of summer, create the perfect incubator for algae and especially Mycrosistis cyanobacteria that produce toxic substances. 

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed